A “Green oasis” out of the trash.

Just a few days ago was opened in Rio de Janeiro the “Sitié”, a former landfill located in the favela Vidigal which has been transformed in an ecologic park. This park has an spectacular view of the sea and the beautiful landscapes of Rio de Janeiro.
This project has been created by a number of volunteers; they are working on it for about six years. This initiative entered in the ONU program about sustainable development, from June 18 this year all foreign delegations could visit this creation that to come out of the trash and is the work of a number of people.
This process consists to perform a cleanup of the area with the implantation of trees and flowers in different places of the favela. One part of this park has been arranged for children to learn gardening
This favela was characterized in Rio de Janeiro because there there is one of the biggest dump in this city. The founder of “Sitié”, Mauro Quintanilha, note that this area was converted into a dump because this was a secluded place, for this reason people started to take their garbage there and thinks that they want to undo.
So that a lot of people used this thinks, useless for some people, to create art. For example the case of a marble craftsman 58 years old that was dedicated to use crystal of the bottles to decorate park benches.
These volunteers become artists; their objective is to use garbage to decorate this place. It isn’t important if it is garbage, the importance is recycle and achieve a richness that comes from the trash.
This part of the favela decided to be evicted because the garbage was very abundant, there aren’t any public service or collection of garbage, as in many others favelas of Rio de Janeiro. The garbage was coming to the vicinity of the Niemever Avenue, which is along the cost.
The cleanup work was carried out for 20 urns volunteers during one year and all that was recoverable or recyclable it was.
The founder of “Sitié”, Mauro Quintanilha, acknowledges that it has been hard to convince people that this site isn’t a dump now a day, have conducted briefings to inform and awareness people. This action was very effective because people today help volunteers to reform the place.
Is important to know that these type of problems are abundant in these places because most people do not recycle, only 26% of the population recycle. Although 86% of the population is aware that it is important to do and duty of all.

The European Parliament request to Venezuela to remain in the IACHR to avoid isolation

The European Parliament urged Venezuela to reconsider its plan to withdraw from the Inter-American Commission on Human Right (IACHR), noting that this could lead the country out of isolation and a “further deterioration” of its record on human rights.

The European Parliament adopted a resolution to that effect by 37 votes in favor, 17 against and 4 abstentions, in the final session in which many MEPs had already left Strasbourg (France), which hosted the plenary.

The document encourages the Government of Venezuela and all other states in the region to “recognize and enforce” the decisions and recommendations of the IACHR to cooperate with regional and international mechanisms of human rights, and urges them to “not take any action that may weaken the protection of human rights”.

MEPs also called on countries that have not yet acceded to the Inter-American Human Rights System “to do so as quickly and fully participate in the same”.

Parliamentarians urged Venezuela to meet the international charters and conventions and regional bodies of which is a signatory.

In this context, considered the decision of the legislative and judicial branches of Venezuela to support the proposal of its president, Hugo Chavez, to withdraw the country from the IACHR, “highlights the failure of the principle of separation of powers in that country and the absolute submission of the legislative and judicial policy decisions of the president.”

In the debate preceding the vote, the Belgian Socialist MEP Veronique De Keyser said that not all members of the Organization of American States (OAS) are members of the IACHR, and cited the example of the United States and Canada.

Although both countries are party to the OAS, has never ratified the American Convention on Human Rights, the main law of the IACHR governed by 25 countries.

However, both countries have to fulfil the obligations that are subject to and are evaluated by the IACHR for having signed the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man.

Liberal Romanian MEP Renate Weber, meanwhile, denied that a country intends to leave the IACHR “when its resolutions are not convenient,” while the Spanish Socialist Maria Muñiz insisted that it was time to “strengthen the institution” and ask the accession of the States of the OAS that have not yet joined it.

In contrast, the Spanish United Left MEP Willy Meyer, said in a statement that the resolution is an “interference of the European right, it decides to adopt this resolution trying to delegitimize the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela in the process towards elections presidential election the month of October. ”

Hugo Chavez announced last month that it has asked the Council of State to prepare arguments to realize their desire to bring the country out of the IACHR, an autonomous organ of the OAS-, accusing it of being “a mechanism” that the U.S. “used “against his country.

Specifically, Venezuela has repeatedly accused the IAHR be biased against him and, since 2002, has denied requests from the Commission to visit the country, considering even supported the attempted coup against the Chavez government in April of that year.

By: Isabel Rivero, Olga Conde, Victoria Gerbaudo & Estefanía Sánchez.

THE CHILDREN OF THE DUMPS

It’s estimated that around half a million of children live in and because of the garbage in Latin America. Olitia, one of the girls exploited in the trash dumps, has worked here since she’s four years old. Every morning she woke up and went to the dump with his mum and his brothers in order to rummage into the wastes looking for some usable scrap or trash which they sold for a bunch of dollars.

After exhausting working days in these conditions, they come back “home” waiting for the next morning. They live in a few cartons and wood or metal boards that they have piled up to have a room. At least, their shelter is near the dump. They are lucky because they don’t need to take the annoying public transport.
If it’s not clear my indignation with the issue, I could write a bit more about other aspects of these children’s daily lives. The food, here, in the dump, it doesn’t exist the concept of daily portions of fruit, or necessary proteins or calories, everyone rescue among the trash whatever they can. Leftover food from a supermarket or something that is not taken many days off dated.

An undeserved life, as an abandoned dog, that ended not only with the Otilia’s childhood but also her life. With thirteen years old, an infection, which wasn’t treated in a medical center, ended her short life. She didn’t know anything but the dump.

In order to understand better the concept and go deep exploring the issue, we can consult the ambitious ILO (International Labour Organization) project webpage. This project is called IPEC (International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour)
The Spanish version of this webpage, defined the waste segregation work as the next: “it consists in recovering a range of materials which afterwards are commercialized in order to be reused or recycled through commonly clandestine companies”. The ILO also says that, most of these children are led to the dumps by their own parents, neighbors or even friends. That’s the way, without other option or chance, how children are initiated in the activity.

The risks of child labor in the dumps are numerous, according to the organization; the more common illnesses are infections, digestive diseases, malnutrition, glass cuts, contact with used syringes and hospital equipment, animal bites and insect stings, etc.

In almost all the American subcontinent, there are thousands of children whose daily routine is quite similar to Otilia’s. In Latin America there are around eleven thousand townships which have a total of twelve thousand public dumps. These trash dumps are today outlaw spaces. The governments practically ignore the situation of the people living there and actually, the dumps are usually controlled by groups which commercialize with their recourses. We are talking about a very serious child exploitation which is evident and even accepted by the society and the political powers.

The marginality of these outskirts near the trash dumps, makes the politicians do not pay a special attention to the problem. This is only one of the many problems whose solution would not increase the votes they will receive in the next elections.

We can’t forget that we are talking about minors, maybe because of having no other choice or maybe because they are exploited, these children are slaves and probably, enslaving a child is the crueler, more coward and repulsive action possible. The children in the dumps become fast in objects whose value is to be used. Talking about human rights in these conditions is simply, hypocrisy and demagogy.

However, this is not a problem exclusive in Latin America, the child exploitation, is extended all over the world. More concretely, working in dumps is gaining popularity in marginal and poor areas as India, the Asiatic southeast and Africa.

The issue is hair bristling when we know that according UNICEF, a total of one hundred and fifty millions children between five and fourteen years old are submitted to child labor.

The issue raises ethic questions as; can we conceive the new powers growth in the international community while they keep with obstacles like the child slavery? Where are the laws which can stop this situation? What are Latin American governments doing in order to palliate this? Is it only a intern problem or should the international community cooperate to solve the issue? And what is more important, can we, the population, obviate that everyday thousands of children life in these conditions?

More personally, it comes to my mind another question, what’s the scope of this article? I will feel satisfied if reading it, every one of us feels indignant and sick of the constant human rights violations, especially when we talk about the more defenseless humans of all, the children.

Numerous nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations are fighting with the goal of improve the quality of life of these children, one of these institutions is the one called: Out of the Dump. They work in Nicaragua to stop with the child labor in la Chureca. La Chureca is the biggest trash dump in the country in which, one million tons of garbage are dumped every day.

The ILO also works for these children, for example, with awareness efforts. “Montañas sin Corazón” is a radio program about this issue. We can hear a fragment in which we know Lupe, Gina and Pedro, three children work segregating wastes.
Finally, I would like to conclude sharing with you a summary video barely four minutes long which show better how living in a dump is.

Isabel Rivero
Victoria Gerbaudo
Estefanía Sánchez
Olga Conde

Interviewing a rootless Cuban: Henrique García Pileta

Henrique and me

Henrique García Pileta looks like Spaniard, he has European ascendance but he was born in Santa Clara, situated in Cuba. He is tall, green-eyed and his skin is pretty white, the only evidence of his precedence is his accent and the stories which he tells. Nowadays, he lives in Madrid, but he was in Cuba during the mandate of Fidel Castro.
We met at a café in order to talk a little about his past, how his life is now and make an interview. I was interested in knowing him more in deep. It is not possible to express here how deeply touched he feels when his memories come to his mind.

Me: Good afternoon Henrique, could you introduce yourself in a few words?
Henrique: Good afternoon Isa, I’m Henrique from Cuba. I’m twenty-three years old and I live here in Spain since I was eighteen years old. My parents were born in La Habana as me, but my grandparents are from Venezuela and Spain.
M: Why did your grandparents leave their countries?
H: Well, it’s not easy to explain. On the one hand, my Spanish grandparents are from Galicia, and they left their city when the Spanish Civil War started in 1936. They had a hard life because they came to Cuba and they started here from nothing. On the other hand, my Venezuelan grandparents are still in Venezuela. They have a big fortune so they have well-off lives.
M: How did you come to Spain?
H: hmm… my parents migrated to Argentina in order to escape from the regime in Cuba when I was thirteen. I couldn’t follow them due to my age. As you may know, if you are under-eighteen, you can’t easily go away from Cuba. Later, my parents moved again from Buenos Aires to Madrid because of the “Corralito”. When I reached the legal age, I came here to meet them.
M: How was your life in Cuba living without your parents?
H: I was living with my Spanish grandparents, but this didn’t make me feel better, even though I love them as much as they were my own parents. I passed my whole teenage alone and missing them. It was hard to stand but that made me grow up.
M: I see that you are getting thrilled, was everything that bad?
H: Not so bad, when you lose someone as important as your parents, you learn how to balance that missing. My friends were a great support for me those years.
M: What’s your opinion about Fidel Castro’s regime that time? Do you think that is something different now with Raul Castro?
H: I don’t feel too interested in politics, but the only thing that annoys me, is that my parents had to leave the island because of the repression there, and consequently, I had to live with my grandparents for those years. From my point of view, a regime that puts borders to your freedom is a dictatorship. I know that some of the Cuban population supports their political party because they consider him the voice of the people. Nowadays, I am not too informed about politics there in Cuba, I felt completely rootless about Cuba. The grandparents that I had there passed away and all my relatives live in Venezuela or Spain.
M: What are the rights that you felt violated by the regime?
H: A clear example is the freedom of residence, I couldn’t choose my home. There is either press freedom or freedom of expression. This make that the Cuban people is apart from the politics. They have of course their own ideologies but under a suppressor regime like this, is not possible to express it.
M: How do you live now?
H: Now I live with my parents in Madrid. I study languages and I feel completely integrated in this multicultural society. Sometimes I feel like in Cuba due to the big Caribbean population here.
M: Your parents left Argentina because of the “Corralito”, as you know there is a growing fear of living a similar situation in Spain. What did your parents tell you about their experience in Argentina?
H: Well, you know, the “Corralito” was a financial crisis where the bank couldn’t stand their debts. Because of that, people couldn’t take their money out of banks. My parents told me that panic took possession of the people in the streets. There were many demonstrations, strikes and riots. The media played its role and alarmed the population even more. My parents took their savings when they couldn’t but by that time, they had already decided to come back to my father’s land, Spain.
M: Do you include in your plans for the future to come back to Cuba?
H: Although sometimes, I miss Cuba, the people there, the atmosphere, the Caribbean sea and all those things, as I told you, I felt a little bit rootless and I can’t forget that was in Cuba where I lived the hardest days of my life without my parents.
M: I hope you reach your goals and be happy forever. Take advantage of your experiences. Thank you very much for your time, it has been a pleasure.
H: The same to you, Thank you very much.

twenty years of like in Spain

Elena Mur is an argentine dentist; she is fifty-four years old and she living in Spain for twenty years exercising her profession. Is very important to know the opinion of the argentine population due to recent events in Argentina. There are a lot of opinions and open debates about this issue and is so important to know the point of view of argentines that live outside their country, for example the case of Elena.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Hello, good morning Elena. How long are you out of Argentina?

Elena Mur: Ok, good morning Vicky, I have been living outside Argentina twenty years, all of them in this country, Spain. Since 1992, I come here whit my boyfriend and more friends.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Why you left your country?
Elena Mur: Because I was young and obviously I wanted to know places, travel and why not? Find new jobs opportunities. I had the opportunity to innovate, change my life and I did it. I don’t regret it.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Why did you choose Spain? What was your view of Spain in that moment?

Elena Mur: Spain was a developed country, there was work, and especially for dentist, Spain put the thing easy to argentine people. Here was more easy the profession, there was more work for us and was easy enter the country. In that moment the diplomatic relations between the two countries were positive. And a very important factor was the language, is similar and this is important considering that I couldn’t speak English, for this reason my options were reduced.
– Victoria Gerbaudo: Does the vision you had of Spain has changed?

Elena Mur: The economic and social situation has changed, obviously in twenty years a lot of things change. But in that moment I liked Spain and now more.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What are the differences between living in a European country like Spain and one South American country like Argentina?

Elena Mur: The biggest difference is in social classes, in Spain there are more equality between social classes. In Argentina exist a large gap and the difference is very evident, if you walk through the streets of Buenos Aires you can see this difference very easily. I have to admit that is very sad and shocking to see this in a country like Argentina, yes isn’t a European country but is evolving and growing in many areas although in some not so.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What should happen to decide to return to Argentina?

Elena Mur: Firstly should change my personal situation, because now I have a family here and I can’t decide go and think only of my. And secondly my professional situation, because both are well now, they should change drastically.
I think that after so long wouldn’t be easy return. And your situation here should be very wrong to decide go away.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: About your country, what do you think about the economic evolution that Argentina had experimented in recent years?
Elena Mur: Argentina is a very variable country, in the last twenty years has experienced periods of high to low stability, but always with an unstable evolution.
Argentina haven’t got long periods of stability, remember “el corralito”, the nationalization of Repsol-YPF now a day…

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What do you think that is the reason for this evolution?

Elena Mur: The current president of government has much support from the population, although this may be questionable. Caring out this policy is easier to govern, and the government has been successful in the economic measures taken.
– Victoria Gerbaudo: Did the “corralito” affect the argentines that were outside Argentina?

Elena Mur: No, didn’t affect. But affected all our families, therefore we were not affected directly but many of us had to borrow money to our family. They had money but they couldn’t remove it the bank.
– Victoria Gerbaudo: Do you think Spain for their current situation may experience a “corralito”?

Elena Mur: Yes sure, if things don’t change. For example the current situation with Bankia now days, if you have money in this bank you certainly can’t take your money out of these. Thus began the “corralito” in Argentina, but Spain is a European country and it’s part of the European Union and for this reason I think that never will reach the extremes that were reached in Argentina.
– Victoria Gerbaudo: What do you think about the new decision of the president to nationalize YPF?

Elena Mur: I totally agree, surely many people surprised with this, probably the ways in whith Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner took decisions are not the most successful, but the action taken, in its essence is positive. Nationalize a company to become a state enterprise.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: How do think will this affect the country?
Elena Mur: I think positively, is possible short-term the situation will be difficult. For example these days a U.S senator is asking Argentina to be expelled from G-20, this is a consequence of the decision taken by Argentina. But in the long term will be positive for the country.
– Victoria Gerbaudo: How do you see Argentina society as to the insecurity that exists?
Elena Mur: I see it very badly, is something in which Argentina no evolved.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Do you think that Argentina, despite the economic crisis, social and cultural level is growing?

Elena Mur: No, unfortunately the social and cultural level is limited to the upper classes. Thirty years ago Argentina was characterized by a highly educated middle class, with many university and young that triumphed worldwide. Education today is very bad and is limited to te upper classes.
This is the end of interview, thank you so much and thank for help my.

twenty yeras of life in Spain

Elena Mur is an argentine dentist; she is fifty-four years old and she living in Spain for twenty years exercising her profession. Is very important to know the opinion of the argentine population due to recent events in Argentina. There are a lot of opinions and open debates about this issue and is so important to know the point of view of argentines that live outside their country, for example the case of Elena.

Image

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Hello, good morning Elena. How long are you out of Argentina?

Elena Mur: Ok, good morning Vicky, I have been living outside Argentina twenty years, all of them in this country, Spain. Since 1992, I come here whit my boyfriend and more friends.

 Victoria Gerbaudo: Why you left your country?

Elena Mur: Because I was young and obviously I wanted to know places, travel and why not? Find new jobs opportunities. I had the opportunity to innovate, change my life and I did it. I don’t regret it.

 Victoria Gerbaudo: Why did you choose Spain? What was your view of Spain in that moment?

Elena Mur: Spain was a developed country, there was work, and especially for dentist, Spain put the thing easy to argentine people. Here was more easy the profession, there was more work for us and was easy enter the country. In that moment the diplomatic relations between the two countries were positive. And a very important factor was the language, is similar and this is important considering that I couldn’t speak English, for this reason my options were reduced.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Does the vision you had of Spain has changed?

Elena Mur: The economic and social situation has changed, obviously in twenty years a lot of things change. But in that moment I liked Spain and now more.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What are the differences between living in a European country like Spain and one South American country like Argentina?

Elena Mur: The biggest difference is in social classes, in Spain there are more equality between social classes. In Argentina exist a large gap and the difference is very evident, if you walk through the streets of Buenos Aires you can see this difference very easily. I have to admit that is very sad and shocking to see this in a country like Argentina, yes isn’t a European country but is evolving and growing in many areas although in some not so.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What should happen to decide to return to Argentina?

Elena Mur: Firstly should change my personal situation, because now I have a family here and I can’t decide go and think only of my. And secondly my professional situation, because both are well now, they should change drastically.
I think that after so long wouldn’t be easy return. And your situation here should be very wrong to decide go away.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: About your country, what do you think about the economic evolution that Argentina had experimented in recent years?

Elena Mur: Argentina is a very variable country, in the last twenty years has experienced periods of high to low stability, but always with an unstable evolution.
Argentina haven’t got long periods of stability, remember “el corralito”, the nationalization of Repsol-YPF now a day…

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What do you think that is the reason for this evolution?

Elena Mur: The current president of government has much support from the population, although this may be questionable. Caring out this policy is easier to govern, and the government has been successful in the economic measures taken.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Did the “corralito” affect the argentines that were outside Argentina?

Elena Mur: No, didn’t affect. But affected all our families, therefore we were not affected directly but many of us had to borrow money to our family. They had money but they couldn’t remove it the bank.

 Victoria Gerbaudo: Do you think Spain for their current situation may experience a “corralito”?

Elena Mur: Yes sure, if things don’t change. For example the current situation with Bankia now days, if you have money in this bank you certainly can’t take your money out of these. Thus began the “corralito” in Argentina, but Spain is a European country and it’s part of the European Union and for this reason I think that never will reach the extremes that were reached in Argentina.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: What do you think about the new decision of the president to nationalize YPF?

Elena Mur: I totally agree, surely many people surprised with this, probably the ways in whith Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner took decisions are not the most successful, but the action taken, in its essence is positive. Nationalize a company to become a state enterprise.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: How do think will this affect the country?

Elena Mur: I think positively, is possible short-term the situation will be difficult. For example these days a U.S senator is asking Argentina to be expelled from G-20, this is a consequence of the decision taken by Argentina. But in the long term will be positive for the country.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: How do you see Argentina society as to the insecurity that exists?

Elena Mur: I see it very badly, is something in which Argentina no evolved.

– Victoria Gerbaudo: Do you think that Argentina, despite the economic crisis, social and cultural level is growing?

Elena Mur: No, unfortunately the social and cultural level is limited to the upper classes. Thirty years ago Argentina was characterized by a highly educated middle class, with many university and young that triumphed worldwide. Education today is very bad and is limited to te upper classes.
This is the end of interview, thank you so much and thank for help my.

INTERVIEW DONE TO: MICHELLE VÁZQUEZ RICCIARDI

(By: Olga Conde Martín)

Michelle Vázquez Ricciardi, is studying at the UEM the second year of the grade of International Relations, she was borned in Caracas, Venezuela, in the 13th of February in 1992. Daughter of an ex naval officer exited Venezuela when she was 10 years old because of the political situation and the fact that her father was black-listed due to his opinionated opinion against the government. After leaving the country she lived in Miramar, Florida USA for 8 years and moved to Spain in July 2010 where she now resides due to her father’s change of assignment inside his company. 

Image

 

-Olga:  What is your opinion about the government and the political situation that Venezuela has been experiencing for more than 10 years?

-Michelle: My opinion, is that Venezuela is experiencing a very hard political situation due to the fact that it has a very corrupt government. The Government that has been in place for more than ten years has caused that Venezuela is seen in the International Community as kind of a “joke” Government, because when the president stands up in front of the UN General Assembly and starts talking about how the devil has been there and “it still smells like sulfur” when referring to another head of state, it gives not only the government or in these case the president and bad name but it also gives the country as a whole a horrible reputation.

 

 -Olga: Is your political tendency in favor or against the current government?

– Michelle: I’m against the current government as well as my whole family

 

-Olga: Do you believe that the increase of corruption and violence that the country is experiencing could change in a near future?

-Michelle: Honestly, it saddens me to say that I believe that it could change but for the worse. The country is in such a horrible state that the citizens are getting used to the violence and the corruption saying things like “well it was only a watch” when it gets stolen. It breaks my heart to know that this situation is only going to get worse; when your government is as corrupt as the one Venezuela has you can only expect bad things to happen to the country.

 

-Olga:  What is your personal opinion on the nationalization of companies done by Chavez?

-Michelle: Personally, and this is a very touchy topic with me because I have personal experience with this process, I hate what he has done too many companies. A lot of people have worked really hard to get there companies to be as prosperous as they were and he just comes and takes them and gives them to people that don’t even know how to work most of the machines nor manage the company. His whole skim is take from the “rich” and give to the “poor” but what he does not understand is that does “rich” people as he calls them have works hard for what they have and he just takes that away. MAKE ABSOLUTELY NO SENSE.

 

-Olga: Due to the fact that this year is election year in Venezuela, who do you believe is going to win and why?

-Michelle: Well I would hope that Henrique Capriles Radonski who won the primaries wins, but I think that Chavez will win once again. He has this way of making even “SUPERMAN” vote for him, and I believe that if he cheats again as he has done in previous years he will win.

 

-Olga: From your experience how do you think that the situation in Venezuela has led to the increase in immigration of Venezuelans to other countries?

-Michelle: From my experience and from the ones of my family members I can say that the political situation is the mayor source of immigration out of Venezuela. People are tired of leaving in danger and fear and if they have the opportunity they usually leave. During the early 2000 the first wave of immigrants started to leave the country to go to the USA or come to Europe but the big wave was during 2004-05 after the national strike were a lot of the elites realized that there was no way out of the hole the country was in.

 

-Olga: After being out of the country for so long and taking into account the political situation the country is in, have you ever wanted to go back?

-Michelle: Of course, above all the problems that the country is in and the horrible situation is facing is my country, were most of my family still lives and most important were my parents meet, got married and had me.. For me it will always be my home land. But saying that I would love to go back, and I have, but just to visit. Living in the USA and in Spain and being raised by my parents have taught me that the way most people leave in Venezuela with fear and no freedom what so ever of speech is no way to live. So I guess the answer is yes and no… Yes, I would love to go back to my country but only to visit not lo live at least not only the situation is taken care of.

 

-Olga: In relation with the previous statement has your perspective about Venezuela changed? This means now that you don’t leave there do you view the country different or in what way do you see it?

-Michelle: I think now I have a very different perspective because I mostly talk about the things my family tells me are happening or what I hear on the news. I’m not there so I don’t really experience it firsthand. but I know that what is happening inside the country is wrong because I’ve lived in places where things are done the right way and is not the way it’s done in Venezuela so it just frustrates me even more knowing that I can’t do anything to change it and that there’s people that still live in those conditions without any way out.

 

-Olga: Having lived in Venezuela and viewing the whole situation do you believe the countries situation has changed? Has it gotten better or worse?

-Michelle: I believe the situation has gotten worst with the years. There has been a huge increase in crime and corruption (If I’m not mistaken we are one of the most corrupt countries in the world) as well as a huge increase of immigration to other countries. I think only this shows that people are not happy with the country and want a way out…

 

-Olga: Thank you very much for your time.

-Michelle: My pleasure.