Interview to a Palestinian Refugee

Interview to  a Palestinian Refugee

Madrid June 11th 2014

It was a sunny afternoon when I took the metro to meet Raed Skaik , a Palestinian refugee studying in Madrid, at a terrace in Plaza de Santa Ana for our appointment. I had to do an Interview for one of my International Relations degree subjects, where Middle East is my area. I have always been really curious about the situation of Palestinian people, who I admire, and the far away resolution of the Israeli conflict; as this struggle goes far beyond what we have seen on the media. I have known Raed for the last 2 years and he was the first person that came to my mind to interview. Raed is a 25 years old young man, holding a Palestinian refugee “passport”, who has suffered what it means to be a stateless person depending on the goodwill of other States. He has traveled around the world, although he has lived in Kuwait for most of his life, country he has to return to every 6 months in order to not loose his residency. Raed started his International Business degree at Temple University in Pennsylvania, although he wasn’t able to finish the degree and 2 years later had to return back to Kuwait and work as an insurance broker, for 2 years. During this time he desired to finish his degree. He arrived to Madrid almost 3 years ago and restarted his studies at Schiller University, where he remains nowadays. Raed has always shown a really passionate interest about world politics, becoming a really interesting and informed debate partner. He has clear opinions about the political conflicts happening right now, and follows really closely what happens around the Arabic peninsula.

I started our Interview asking Raed about the possible threat of Iran to the Middle-East, when talking about this, he made up some really interesting statements about the roll of Hezbollah involving in Syria. “Well there are two points of view” he told me; from the good side we find Iran supporting the resistant groups of Hezbollah and Hamas by providing weapons and training in order to fight the “common and first Arabic enemy”, Israel. Along with this, the weapons arrive to Hezbollah via Syria, fact that give us an explanation of why the militia group is fighting along side with Bashar Al Assad against the Syrian rebels; “In this way, Hezbollah position could be justified since Bashar Al Assad is his ally; without him, it would be a weak resistance group and wouldn’t be able to face Israel in any future war” he stated, measuring his words carefully. On the other hand, the bad point could be that Iran is trying to spread the Shia believe in the Sunni Arabic countries, “a fact that most of the Arabs condemn” , knowing Raed for such a long time allowed me to know that he felt the same way about his last statement.

My next question, which I was anxious to ask, was : “From a Palestinian view, what do you think would be the solution for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?”. The look on his face, after the inquiry, turned serious and sad. For Raed the currently most possible solution would be that the Palestinian people accept their weakness and surrender to Israel, giving up more territories of the few ones they have left, but after saying this he affirms that : “I believe this solution, if it happens, will not last forever, since there is a land that is still stolen ”. The other solution could be resist until Palestinians get it back. The problem we face in this conflict is that none of the parts are willing to give their arms to twist.

After this last question we took a break, in which we order a cup of coffee. During this pause we started debating about the idea of the Arabic Spring spreading to the Gulf Countries; the observations he made about the subject were so wonderful and wise , that it would be a worthless act to try to write out what he said: “Gulf countries are rich countries, and the main reason why the Arabic spring happened was poverty ; and since poverty has a small percentage its hard for the Arabic spring to spread right now, but in the future it must spread because this countries are controlled by dictators and there are many civil rights and freedoms that are not being given to the people of these countries, par example: in Saudi Arabia women can’t drive, and they recently got their right to vote so, in my opinion, the people of these countries are not doing anything right now against their governments, because their governments are spreading the wealth by giving free money to the people in order to remain silent about the other things they don’t get, but the upcoming generations will realize that there are things that are more important than just having money. Looking at the neighboring countries that already had the Arabic spring and seeing how they became more free in this societies, will make them revolve against the governments. Because we could say that the Arabic spring is like a cancer, if it hits one country it will go to all the body, because the people from the Middle East and North Africa have the same language, same culture, same religion and same problems, so what affects one, affects the rest.”

When our interview was done, my curiosity and fascination about the Middle East regions, increased; as sharing thoughts with a native well informed citizen, is more delightful and enriching than just turning on TV or reading a newspaper, as opinions in media have been bought.

Paula Sanz Dominguez

Raed Skaik, Palestinian refugee

Raed Skaik, Palestinian refugee

Interview to a Palestinian Refugee

Interview to  a Palestinian Refugee

Madrid June 11th 2014

It was a sunny afternoon when I took the metro to meet Raed Skaik , a Palestinian refugee studying in Madrid, at a terrace in Plaza de Santa Ana for our appointment. I had to do an Interview for one of my International Relations degree subjects, where Middle East is my area. I have always been really curious about the situation of Palestinian people, who I admire, and the far away resolution of the Israeli conflict; as this struggle goes far beyond what we have seen on the media. I have known Raed for the last 2 years and he was the first person that came to my mind to interview. Raed is a 25 years old young man, holding a Palestinian refugee “passport”, who has suffered what it means to be a stateless person depending on the goodwill of other States. He has traveled around the world, although he has lived in Kuwait for most of his life, country he has to return to every 6 months in order to not loose his residency. Raed started his International Business degree at Temple University in Pennsylvania, although he wasn’t able to finish the degree and 2 years later had to return back to Kuwait and work as an insurance broker, for 2 years. During this time he desired to finish his degree. He arrived to Madrid almost 3 years ago and restarted his studies at Schiller University, where he remains nowadays. Raed has always shown a really passionate interest about world politics, becoming a really interesting and informed debate partner. He has clear opinions about the political conflicts happening right now, and follows really closely what happens around the Arabic peninsula.

I started our Interview asking Raed about the possible threat of Iran to the Middle-East, when talking about this, he made up some really interesting statements about the roll of Hezbollah involving in Syria. “Well there are two points of view” he told me; from the good side we find Iran supporting the resistant groups of Hezbollah and Hamas by providing weapons and training in order to fight the “common and first Arabic enemy”, Israel. Along with this, the weapons arrive to Hezbollah via Syria, fact that give us an explanation of why the militia group is fighting along side with Bashar Al Assad against the Syrian rebels; “In this way, Hezbollah position could be justified since Bashar Al Assad is his ally; without him, it would be a weak resistance group and wouldn’t be able to face Israel in any future war” he stated, measuring his words carefully. On the other hand, the bad point could be that Iran is trying to spread the Shia believe in the Sunni Arabic countries, “a fact that most of the Arabs condemn” , knowing Raed for such a long time allowed me to know that he felt the same way about his last statement.

My next question, which I was anxious to ask, was : “From a Palestinian view, what do you think would be the solution for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?”. The look on his face, after the inquiry, turned serious and sad. For Raed the currently most possible solution would be that the Palestinian people accept their weakness and surrender to Israel, giving up more territories of the few ones they have left, but after saying this he affirms that : “I believe this solution, if it happens, will not last forever, since there is a land that is still stolen ”. The other solution could be resist until Palestinians get it back. The problem we face in this conflict is that none of the parts are willing to give their arms to twist.

After this last question we took a break, in which we order a cup of coffee. During this pause we started debating about the idea of the Arabic Spring spreading to the Gulf Countries; the observations he made about the subject were so wonderful and wise , that it would be a worthless act to try to write out what he said: “Gulf countries are rich countries, and the main reason why the Arabic spring happened was poverty ; and since poverty has a small percentage its hard for the Arabic spring to spread right now, but in the future it must spread because this countries are controlled by dictators and there are many civil rights and freedoms that are not being given to the people of these countries, par example: in Saudi Arabia women can’t drive, and they recently got their right to vote so, in my opinion, the people of these countries are not doing anything right now against their governments, because their governments are spreading the wealth by giving free money to the people in order to remain silent about the other things they don’t get, but the upcoming generations will realize that there are things that are more important than just having money. Looking at the neighboring countries that already had the Arabic spring and seeing how they became more free in this societies, will make them revolve against the governments. Because we could say that the Arabic spring is like a cancer, if it hits one country it will go to all the body, because the people from the Middle East and North Africa have the same language, same culture, same religion and same problems, so what affects one, affects the rest.”

When our interview was done, my curiosity and fascination about the Middle East regions, increased; as sharing thoughts with a native well informed citizen, is more delightful and enriching than just turning on TV or reading a newspaper, as opinions in media have been bought.

Paula Sanz Dominguez

Image

Raed Skaik, Palestinian Refugee

Interview with Mr. Rachid Sator,Minister Counselor Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy of Algeria in Madrid.

This year was highlighted by several important events such as: the presidential elections, social changes and development based on considerable human and natural resources, and a privileged geostrategic position that can allow Algeria to win a role as a regional leader. Last Thursday, we had the honor to interview Sir Rachid Sator, Minister Counselor at the embassy of Algeria in Madrid.

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The context was propitious to questions related to diplomacy, as we were in the embassy with the Algerian diplomat. First, I asked him about the bilateral relations between Algeria and Spain, he answered that they are positive for both countries and adding  that  Algeria and Spain are going through a rapid growth “ there are several  visits and delegations in different fields : economic, political and diplomatic ”. Then, my second question was about the cultural exchange.  Without any hesitation, he said that it is very closed and dynamic, arguing that the geographical proximity is one reason because Algeria and Spain are separated few kilometers by the Mediterranean Sea. In addition, they have a historical link. He explained that some cities of Algeria had been colonized for nearly two hundred years. Giving the example of Oran, the second most important city after Algiers, this is still considered as the most Hispanic city in Africa by the Spanish people themselves.  Furthermore, Santa Cruz ford is its famous symbol. There are large human interactions between both countries that have been developed over the centuries.  Therefore, there is a brewing cultural exchange. Later, I asked him about the Algerian position between the Arab countries. He answered that Regarding the Arab world; Algeria is a full member of the Arab league which regroups countries of the Middle East and the Maghreb. Arabic is its official language within its borders, even though it has a particularism compared to the Arab countries. Indeed, the Algerian society is composed by different ethnic groups who share their own dialect “les Kabyles” for example.  During the interview, Sir Rachid Sator spoke about   the Arab spring which has shacked the Arab world “In 2011, several popular revolutions affected an entire system, Algeria was certainly saved because the reforms begun in 1988, which led to the establishment of a political plurality. Regarding freedom of expression, you can open a newspaper and see caricatures about the Algerian president and political officials. Nowadays, the media landscape is very rich created by a large freedom of expression.  The political field today is constituted of 30% of women either at the assembled elected officials, national or communal level.

The question about the future of the Algerian oil resources was crucial. Indeed, a decline in hydrocarbon production was officially announced by the Prime Minister, Malek Sellal. The oil resources which remain the main economic resource of the country are threatened of extinction in the next 15 years. The Algerian government is forced to find another solution in order to save its own economy, by changing its hydrocarbon law in January 2013 to open the way to the exploitation of unconventional energy resources. According to the report of the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the country holds the third largest recoverable shale gas reserves in the world.   Therefore,  shale gas seems to be a good issue for the country, not only to meet the rising annual local demand for energy, but also to cover the total public expenditure, the cost of social transfers and to guarantee the continuation of subsidies on basic commodities, which represent 30% of the total budget. According to the Minister counselor Rachid Sator, in 2014, the trend is using the same mono-exporting system; Algeria must face the facts that fossil fuels will disappear one day or another, we must substitute the status of mono exporter, and Algeria has enough means.  “Concerning the exploitation Shale Gas, if the extraction method is not harmful and dangerous for people and the environment.  Then why not?  If you have a wealth under your feet and you can use it without major damage, I do not see any state that will refuse to take the risk”.

A huge development is being done in terms of agriculture, industry and tourism. The Algerian government is working in order to replace oil exploitations by other energy sources such as solar energy and wind energy.” Our Sahara could allow a potential solar energy exploitation, 12mounths/ 12 of warm weather and it is an unconventional energy that can last forever”. Sir Rachid Sator added “Actually, which is essential; is to change the mono exporter structure and be more competitive in terms of agriculture because Algeria has a temperate climate. Concerning tourism, we are developing it continuously. Most of the Algerian youth have high level of study. The access to education is accessible and free. Young graduate people can create their own businesses, and of course, sometimes it requires a help from the states.”

The last part of the interview was dedicated to the refugee issue. Lebanon is facing a crucial refugee crisis since the beginning of the civil war in Syria and the deterioration in Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Minister Counselor answered that “In diplomacy, the refugee crisis is called: collateral damage. Because of the Palestinian issue that unfortunately has not find a solution, over 3, 6 million Palestinians live outside their country. As the international community has the means to exert pressure on Israel, it is necessary to collaborate and discuss in order to find a solution to this perpetual conflict. Concerning Syria, it is experiencing a civil war, an end to this conflict can only pass through dialogue, it will not resolve by itself.”

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Assia Meghfour Lacheheb

Interview to a Palestinian Refugee

Interview to  a Palestinian Refugee

Madrid June 11th 2014

It was a sunny afternoon when I took the metro to meet Raed Skaik , a Palestinian refugee studying in Madrid, at a terrace in Plaza de Santa Ana for our appointment. I had to do an Interview for one of my International Relations degree subjects, where Middle East is my area. I have always been really curious about the situation of Palestinian people, who I admire, and the far away resolution of the Israeli conflict; as this struggle goes far beyond what we have seen on the media. I have known Raed for the last 2 years and he was the first person that came to my mind to interview. Raed is a 25 years old young man, holding a Palestinian refugee “passport”, who has suffered what it means to be a stateless person depending on the goodwill of other States. He has traveled around the world, although he has lived in Kuwait for most of his life, country he has to return to every 6 months in order to not loose his residency. Raed started his International Business degree at Temple University in Pennsylvania, although he wasn’t able to finish the degree and 2 years later had to return back to Kuwait and work as an insurance broker, for 2 years. During this time he desired to finish his degree. He arrived to Madrid almost 3 years ago and restarted his studies at Schiller University, where he remains nowadays. Raed has always shown a really passionate interest about world politics, becoming a really interesting and informed debate partner. He has clear opinions about the political conflicts happening right now, and follows really closely what happens around the Arabic peninsula.

I started our Interview asking Raed about the possible threat of Iran to the Middle-East, when talking about this, he made up some really interesting statements about the roll of Hezbollah involving in Syria. “Well there are two points of view” he told me; from the good side we find Iran supporting the resistant groups of Hezbollah and Hamas by providing weapons and training in order to fight the “common and first Arabic enemy”, Israel. Along with this, the weapons arrive to Hezbollah via Syria, fact that give us an explanation of why the militia group is fighting along side with Bashar Al Assad against the Syrian rebels; “In this way, Hezbollah position could be justified since Bashar Al Assad is his ally; without him, it would be a weak resistance group and wouldn’t be able to face Israel in any future war” he stated, measuring his words carefully. On the other hand, the bad point could be that Iran is trying to spread the Shia believe in the Sunni Arabic countries, “a fact that most of the Arabs condemn” , knowing Raed for such a long time allowed me to know that he felt the same way about his last statement.

My next question, which I was anxious to ask, was : “From a Palestinian view, what do you think would be the solution for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?”. The look on his face, after the inquiry, turned serious and sad. For Raed the currently most possible solution would be that the Palestinian people accept their weakness and surrender to Israel, giving up more territories of the few ones they have left, but after saying this he affirms that : “I believe this solution, if it happens, will not last forever, since there is a land that is still stolen ”. The other solution could be resist until Palestinians get it back. The problem we face in this conflict is that none of the parts are willing to give their arms to twist.

After this last question we took a break, in which we order a cup of coffee. During this pause we started debating about the idea of the Arabic Spring spreading to the Gulf Countries; the observations he made about the subject were so wonderful and wise , that it would be a worthless act to try to write out what he said: “Gulf countries are rich countries, and the main reason why the Arabic spring happened was poverty ; and since poverty has a small percentage its hard for the Arabic spring to spread right now, but in the future it must spread because this countries are controlled by dictators and there are many civil rights and freedoms that are not being given to the people of these countries, par example: in Saudi Arabia women can’t drive, and they recently got their right to vote so, in my opinion, the people of these countries are not doing anything right now against their governments, because their governments are spreading the wealth by giving free money to the people in order to remain silent about the other things they don’t get, but the upcoming generations will realize that there are things that are more important than just having money. Looking at the neighboring countries that already had the Arabic spring and seeing how they became more free in this societies, will make them revolve against the governments. Because we could say that the Arabic spring is like a cancer, if it hits one country it will go to all the body, because the people from the Middle East and North Africa have the same language, same culture, same religion and same problems, so what affects one, affects the rest.”

When our interview was done, my curiosity and fascination about the Middle East regions, increased; as sharing thoughts with a native well informed citizen, is more delightful and enriching than just turning on TV or reading a newspaper, as opinions in media have been bought.

Raed Skaik, Palestinian Refugee

Raed Skaik, Palestinian Refugee

Paula Sanz Domínguez

 

 

“The Qatari wannabe is not wanted”

 “The Qatari wannabe is not wanted”

Qatar World Cup 2022./http://elmed.io/que-pasa-con-qatar-2022/

Qatar World Cup 2022./http://elmed.io/que-pasa-con-qatar-2022/

When Qatar was elected to headquartering the World Cup in 2022, the decision raised surprise among the football world. Nowadays, doubts about the suitability of this small, but rich country are rising, and the fact that the FIFA has been embroiled in a scandal makes us think that the games should not be hosted in the Arabic emirate.

Actually , the focus of the controversy are the high temperatures that football players and spectators will have to stand; since during summer , temperatures in Qatar rise up to 45 Cº.Along with this, we can also find the comical fact concerning the dress code that is being imposed by the Cultural Islamic Centre of Qatar ,under the catchword “Reflect your respect”, that is calling westerners, who will assist to the event, to dress under the Qatari ideals assuming that no T-shirts, short pants, or dresses should be worn ; something hard to preserve if we take into account the high temperatures this visitors will have to suffer. This controversy led the FIFA president, Joseph Blattler, to admit that “It would be an irresponsibility that the World Cup is played with that level of temperature”, BusinessWeek magazine reported.

Qatar dresscode./http://dohanews.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/tumblr_m542roNn2x1qhhgvuo4_1280.jpg

Qatar dresscode./http://dohanews.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/tumblr_m542roNn2x1qhhgvuo4_1280.jpg

The “mystery” of how Qatar’s football chief used the country’s vast wealth to help win crucial votes for the World Cup, was revealed in documents leaked to the English newspaper, Sunday Times. Mohammed Bin Hammam made payments of 3.7 billion euros to 30 presidents of African football associations for buying the 2022 Qatar’s World Cup, according to the documents published by The Sunday Times. On the other hand the Qatari organization for the World Cup expressed in an official statement “Qatar won the seat in good law and we are confident that at the end of the process, the headquarters of the World Cup 2022 will be confirmed”.

Corruption, exploitation and slavery dominate the bad image of the wannabe World Cup nation while low cost-workers are approached from neighboring states to do the unpriced work for others.

However, it is also a chance to be the first Arabic country to host the Football World Cup and in this way, get a status in the community of the “big ones”. Apart from the accusations of fraud, which makes us to think that Qatar has not been “democratically” elected; at the end, everything that Qatar earned by the event will be blown away by the sand. The tourists leave; the stadiums will be empty and unused. The country needs time. That is not any racism; that is logical deduction of obviously facts. One day Qatar will be ready, perhaps for the World Cup in 2026, but not now, not as a wannabe.

“The Switzerland of the Middle East”.- An interview with Mr. Al-Abbas Al-Harthi

“The Switzerland of the Middle East”.

At the Oman Embassy with Mr. Al-Abbas Al-Harthi.

At the Oman Embassy with Mr. Al-Abbas Al-Harthi.

 

Throughout the last trimester, in the course of International current day observatory, we chose a specific area of the world and put each of us by different groups according the regions. My classmates and I chose the Middle East´s region because we were really interests in the place and we thought that it was an “unexplored region”.

So to end the trimester assignment, we were assigned to do an individual interview with someone from our region. I thought that this was a difficult task as my place was a little difficult with all the conflicts going on there. So, I decided to send an e-mail to the Oman Embassy to arrange an interview for the reasons that I could learn so much about the country as I did not have a clue. I will like to thank officially to the Embassy for answering me fastly and for making an appointment with the Deputy Chief of Mission in Madrid.

The past Friday, 6th of June, I got the pleasure of interviewing the Deputy Chief of Mission, Mr. Al-Abbas Al-Harthi, at the Sultanate of Oman Embassy. First of all, I may say that my region was a complicate area to study, and I was concern about someone speaking to me about the region.

The first part of the interview is focused in its geographical position. After the Sultan Qaboos deposed his father in 1970, he told me that the country starts to “open up exteriorly”. The Sultan brought “modernity to us” and Oman became the six-nation Gulf Cooperation. A difference with other Arab countries is the freedom that women have.  “In our country, women are able to vote, to stand for elections, to drive, to work and many more things”. He explained that this “liberalism” is the product of all the effort and work that the Sultan have been doing after this past 40 years, “He is doing many things for Omanis”. “Oman is a modern and liberal country; but I admit that progress will bring more joy”.

During the interview, I was concerned in Oman´s foreign relations, as I did not have any idea about it. Mr. Al-Abbas Al-Harthi explained all the current relations. “We have several relations with European countries as France, Germany, Portugal, Spain, Italy and Holland.  Most relations are in oil trade and building projects”.  Specially, King Juan Carlos I went in the past April to Oman to sign the MoU in the field of arching any type of historical document regarding the relations between both.

However, on the same, they signed an agreement aimed at avoiding double †taxation and tax evasion in income tax. Mr. Al.Abbas Al-Harthi: “The Sultanate has reached a total of 35 agreements on the avoidance of double taxation with different countries and it will continue doing it”.

Last visit of king Juan Carlos I in Oman./Source: http://www.lavanguardia.com

Last visit of king Juan Carlos I in Oman./Source: http://www.lavanguardia.com

 

An example of a Spanish company working in Oman´s field is INDRA. “It won 85 million contract to modernize ours airports and air traffic control systems”. He informed that the five European countries listed before are competing for winning the future plan of project of Oman. “We are planning to build a railway from the borders of UAE to the South-West of the country. In August, the competitors will now who will be in charge of our project”.

The second part of the interview consisted in its economy. Oman is a middle-income economy that is heavily dependent on oil resources. It is the 25th country of oil reserves in the world. The main industries of the economy are: crude oil production and natural gas production. “Many countries are interested in our natural resources”. “We export to China, Japan, UAE, South Korea and in few less to Europe”.

Tourism is a key component of the government’s ability to effectively balance its budget if oil revenues decline. “Tourism is almost every nation is important; not only for money; also to have a better connection outside”.

They want to have more tourism. The typical tourisst are from UK, France, Italy, and Germany. He stated:” As there are not direct flights from Spain to Oman; the numbers of Spaniards are lees to visit us. We are working to include in the Oman´s airlines direct flights”.  The best places to visit are the capital, Muscat, Khasab, Nizwa and Salah. “I recommended you to go during the moth of October to March because temperatures are to high around 47ºC”.

To conclude with the interview, we were debating a little about the abdication of the Spain King Juan Carlos I. As He explained the good relations with Spain, I was concerned if the abdication could have a negative aspect between both countries. His answer was concrete and simple:” Of course we have very relation with King Juan Carlos I, but my personal opinion is that the abdication will not provoke any kind of negativity with us.  Oman will have foreign relation with Spain even the King will not be there”.

It was a great time spent at the Embassy with Mr.Al-Abbas Al-Harthi. It gave me the opportunity of getting in touch with the country and learn many more aspects about it, and understand better the Middle East region with its cons and pros. The interview was a great choice and I canot wait to see for my own eyes the country and visit it.

Once again, I will like to finish the interview thanking the Sultanate of Oman Embassy for giving the great opportunity, and also describing the country as “the Switzerland of the Middle east” for been so neutral.

 

Paula Miñambres Vallejo.

 

Palestinian new government enrages Israel.

Seven years they have been divided, now Hamas and Fatah build the Palestinian government again. The low influence of the parliament has already become clear during the administration of the oath. Israel criticized the new unity government. Both United States and the European Union accept the cabinet.

Leaders of Hamas and Fatah.//Source: http://www.timesofisrael.com/

Leaders of Hamas and Fatah.//Source: http://www.timesofisrael.com/

On Monday, the first Palestinian reconciliation government began his career in order to move towards the establishment of an independent state influenced by territorial and political divisions: the West Bank, run by Fatah, and Gaza, dominated by the Islamist group Hamas.

This transitional government of national consensus is the result of the last reconciliation agreement signed by the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and Hamas, which took place in Gaza on April 23. Composed of 17 ministers,appointed by both groups for their professional value rather than their political affiliation, this new team will be headed by Rami Hamdallah. Its members were sworn in the presence of President, Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah, in the occupied West Bank, where the headquarters of the Palestinian presidency is located. Fatah and Hamas have been slow to reach a consensus on the issue of the Ministry of Prisoners. The latter discrepancy has seemed to threaten the entire project of reunification of the Palestinian ranks. However, Abbas stated: ‘‘Today we declare the end of division that has caused our catastrophic damage in the past seven years.”

President Mahmud Abbas has sworn new minister president Rami Hamdallah.//Source: La Presse.

President Mahmud Abbas has sworn new minister president Rami Hamdallah.//Source: La Presse.

Israel started hostilities after the new government consensus of Palestine was established: Prime Minister Benjamin refuses to deal with the new government of national consensus; he rejects any negotiations about peace with the new Palestinian government and notifies push punitive measures. Furthermore, the Israelis are also resentful because of the acceptance of the government by the United States. Israel´s plan to expand construction in East Jerusalem and in Jewish settlement in the West Bank, drawing Palestinian outrage. The Israeli government has warned to impose financial sanctions on the new Palestinian executive. In short, Israel will stop the transfer of amounts of customs duties and taxes levied on Palestinian goods. These duties permit to pay the salaries of military and civilian employees. Immediately after uttering his threat, Netanyahu sent his bombers in the Gaza Strip. Contrary, Rami Hamdallah‘s government is going to enforce the stop of the Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip in order to protect this new consensus.

Prime Minister of Isreal, Benjamin Netanjahu, boycotts the Palestinian government.//Source: www.google.com/search?=israel+consensus+Fatah+et+hamas

Prime Minister of Isreal, Benjamin Netanjahu, boycotts the Palestinian government.//Source: http://www.google.com/search?=israel+consensus+Fatah+et+hamas

In a televised speech broadcast the outgoing Prime Minister of Hamas in Gaza, Ismail Haniyeh, praised the Palestinian people. He described the event as a historic moment for the Palestinian population and said that the new government is opposed to violence.

Speaking about the event, the European Union said it was not opposed to the Palestinian reconciliation and it will judge the new government on its actual position. The position of the United States, traditional allies of Israel, is not very different from the Brussels position. The U.S. Secretary of the States, John Kerry, in a telephone conversation with the President, said that Washington considers the new Government’s policy and its composition. The United States will work together with Prime Minister Hamdallah.